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Abortion survivors, in wake of Supreme Court ruling, reveal their ‘trauma’ but rejoice in a ‘new dawn’

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In the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling on Friday that sends abortion-related decisions back to the states, three abortion survivors appeared on “Fox & Friends Weekend” on Saturday to share their personal experiences and that of their mothers — and how their lives played out after the early trauma they experienced.

Melissa Ohden, Priscilla Hurley and Micaella Clay spoke on Saturday morning about what they went through — and how they feel today.

“I survived a failed saline infusion abortion attempt back in 1977,” said Ohden.  

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“After being poisoned and scalded in the womb over a five-day period, I was accidentally born alive in the final step of that abortion procedure,” she revealed. 

Demonstrators gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on June 24, 2022, the day the high court issued its monumental ruling on abortion.
(Fox News Digital/Lisa Bennatan)

As Ohden, an Iowa native, says on her own website about her circumstances, “I don’t believe God originally wrote abortion into my life, as God is the creator of life, but when it was introduced by man, or in my case, a woman, He rewrote the story of my life around it, to create the story of a life that is more intricate, more redemptive [and] more grace-filled than anything anyone else could have planned or written.”

It wasn’t until her teens that she learned the truth of how she was born.

Ohden is founder of the Abortion Survivors Network.

“God is the creator of life, but when it was introduced by man, or in my case, a woman, He rewrote the story of my life around it.”

Micaella Clay, for her part, explained that she was “born through an aspiration vacuum” when her birth mother did not realize how far along her pregnancy had been. Clay survived the abortion attempt — which she was told took place likely at the end of the second trimester or early in the third trimester. 

She said she experienced lot of health challenges in her life as a result of the “traumatic birth” she endured.

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Priscilla Hurley also shared her personal story — which included two abortions that she herself went through until she was able to “break the cycle.”

“My survival story started obviously in the womb,” said Hurley, adding that her mother was “a grieving widow” with four children who decided “to cross the border into Mexico” for an abortion once she learned she was pregnant again.

An anti-abortion demonstrator protests in front of the Supreme Court building, on the day arguments were heard in the Mississippi abortion rights case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health, in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 1, 2021.

An anti-abortion demonstrator protests in front of the Supreme Court building, on the day arguments were heard in the Mississippi abortion rights case Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 1, 2021.
(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Hurley survived the abortion attempt and said she was probably around 12-15 weeks gestation around the time the procedure took place, she said.

Several months later, Hurley was born — with her mother assuming there had likely been a twin. 

“There’s a lot to be said about the trauma of abortion,” added Hurley.

She finally “came to faith in Christ at [age] 31 after I gave birth to my son.”

She said “the trauma” in her life started for her in the womb and then “played out” for quite some time. 

She said she had two abortions herself — and that for a period of time, she worked at an abortion clinic.

“But something has to break the cycle,” she said — and for her, she finally “came to faith in Christ at [age] 31 after I gave birth to my son,” she said.

Women are shown holding a "Jesus Saves" sign in Washington, D.C.

Women are shown holding a “Jesus Saves” sign in Washington, D.C.
(Joshua Comins/Fox News Digital)

And that is “what broke the cycle for me,” she said.

The women also described their feelings of relief and joy now after the Supreme Court’s decision on Friday.

“The reality is that the abortion that was meant to end my life and had no constitutional basis, ever, impacted my own children — and so now this enters a new dawn for our country and for generations,” said Ohden.

Dr. Tim Clinton, president of the American Association of Christian Counselors, told Fox News Digital in a statement after the Supreme Court’s decision on abortion on Friday, “Life has won, justice has been done and our work to care for America’s moms has just begun.”

Clinton, who also serves as executive director of the James Dobson Family Institute and recurring co-host of “Dr. James Dobson’s Family Talk,” said as well, “This is the legacy of a generation of evangelicals, Catholics and others who had the courage to engage in the public square, to vote their values and to push against the cultural forces that would even sacrifice children to advance their agenda. We rejoice.”

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To learn more about the three women’s stories of surviving abortion, watch the video at the top of this article, or click here to access it

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